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vandrizzle
Level 1


USA
48 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2010 :  16:02:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been doing a lot of shows lately for my juggling charity and I really dn't consider myself a performer, so I have some questions for more experienced stage jugglers out there.

1) I know this sounds stupid but when it comes time to bow, I never really know what to do and always end up doing some sort of realy uncomfortable looking back bend. what's an appropriate bow technique for a juggler?

2) Some people say I look too confident when i attempt my really hard tricks that i drop on the first attempt. How can i acknowledge that a trick is very difficult and sort of get the audience on their kneed without completely slowing down my routine?

3) I know with public speaking people say to look t the audience and i know with juggling that's just impossible but do you make attempts in the middle of some easier tricks to look at the audience?

4) when using torches, I use Tiki torch oil. Is there something better I can use to make torches safer/better looking? and what's the best way to put them out? i use a damp towel but sometimes after folding both ends over the torches, I'll open it and they'll be on fire still.

thanks for the help!

Dave Altman
Administrator



Georgia
621 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2010 :  21:59:27  Show Profile  Visit Dave Altman's Homepage Send Dave Altman a Private Message  Reply with Quote
1. Don't over think it. An actual bow isn't necessary. You can just look at the audience and wave as you walk off stage. Are you doing a back bend? To me, a back bend is bending your back where your head gets closer to your heels. That really would be an weird way to end a show.

2. I don't have a suggestion for this question.

3. Yes, make eye contact as much as possible. You can stop completely to do this. The audience needs places called "Applause Points." It's a momentary break in the action where they can applaud the several great tricks in a row you just did.

4. Gulf Charcoal Starter fluid worked well for me. It doesn't flame up big at first and die real quick like some fuels. A damp towel is the best thing I know of, just don't unfold it. You are giving it more air by unfolding it and causing it to restart. If it is a damp towel, put the torches in it and fold it, the flames will go out.


"A successful individual typically sets his next goal somewhat but not too much above his last achievement. In this way he steadily raises his level of aspiration." ~Kurt Lewin
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anthonygatto
Forum Admin



USA
4280 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2010 :  22:33:44  Show Profile  Visit anthonygatto's Homepage Send anthonygatto a Private Message  Reply with Quote
1.) Always stand with confidence on stage, express an aura about yourself that says you are the ones watching me, therefore I am in control here. Tension in your body should be constant, never just stand there as if you were window shopping. Make your presence known at every moment.

In bowing, it really depends on your style and where you are performing. In Europe, I could just end my act and stand still, just looking at the audience and nodding to them. If I were to take one step, then they would think I was going to do something else, and the applause would die. You will grasp how long you can stay and accept applause after many performances. Going down on one knee once or twice for a bow can look nice, but it has to be at the right moment.

2.) Don't drop to make something look difficult. You may drop again, then just look bad. It's about the set up. When I do nine rings, I take a pause and a breath, I look up, pause let the audience know with my body language this trick is not easy. When it's over, feel the jubilation running through you and express it in your body language. You must express all your emotions through the art of performance, think about that for a moment. Think Samurai warrior. Every move they make is deliberate and commanding, be that samurai. This is an expression created by David Shiner, famed clown and director. You're a SAMURAI!

3.) Eye contact should be made every time you get a chance. Try to look at the people so deeply, that you can remember what some of them were wearing. Don't forget to acknowledge the people in the back, even though you can't see them. This is where you will use that piercing look as if your looking at someone in particular, but can't see a damn thing. The people in the front row more than likely paid a higher price for their ticket, so they definitely deserve your attention. FInd some cute girls, give 'em a smile.

4.) Colman fuel works great for torches, ignite fast, not much smoke at all. Can also be used to clean them off. An air tight box can put them out, however they do stay on fire for a few seconds in the box which makes it hot inside which cause and decorative tape to want to melt a bit.... which is why you use Coleman fuel to clean off the sticky residue.

The most important thing for someone at your level is to try and have fun. Go out there and let them know you're doing what you love, and your having a ball doing it. Remember the audience is on your side in the beginning, but can quickly turn.

Hope this helps.

A.G.

Art the end result of perception, wisdom, intelligence, discipline, hard work, passion, luck, accident, and coincidence.

A very smart unknown source
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Caio Stevanovich
Level 3



Brazil
868 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2010 :  23:39:17  Show Profile  Visit Caio Stevanovich's Homepage  Click to see Caio Stevanovich's MSN Messenger address Send Caio Stevanovich a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Dave and Anthony already answered your questions, so I think that the best advice that I can give to you, is enjoy what you're doing. The audience will know that, for sure. ;)

============
Caio Cesar Stevanovich

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vandrizzle
Level 1



USA
48 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2010 :  23:37:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks fr the help!
On a side note: I think my focus in juggling has changed a bit. I haven't had the time to mindlessly attempt the same siteswap over and over again lately and it's made me appreciate how much fun juggling can be and to not take it so seriously anymore. I'm beginning to look at juggling as a tool that i have to help people and to entertain rather than a sport. I've been performing a lot lately and it's far more fun than competing with a 2:00 routine only decipherable by a computer program that no one outside of juggling really knows about. When I finally got out of my backyard and started juggling in front of people, the whole thing just became more useful, ive even been able to actually make a little bit of money at it.

sorry for that rant, I just felt like other young jugglers might be able to get something from it.

=)
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Dave Altman
Administrator



Georgia
621 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2010 :  07:33:17  Show Profile  Visit Dave Altman's Homepage Send Dave Altman a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by vandrizzle

Thanks fr the help!
On a side note: ...I'm beginning to look at juggling as a tool that i have to help people and to entertain rather than a sport. I've been performing a lot lately and it's far more fun than competing with a 2:00 routine only decipherable by a computer program that no one outside of juggling really knows about. When I finally got out of my backyard and started juggling in front of people, the whole thing just became more useful, ive even been able to actually make a little bit of money at it.

sorry for that rant, I just felt like other young jugglers might be able to get something from it.

It's not a rant, or at least not a rant that Anthony*, myself**, and others that actually have been performing for a while have been saying for about five years of this forum.

Backyard juggling and performing are two different things. There is nothing wrong with backyard jugglers, but they do need to realize that if they want to do anything besides juggling in their backyards for free, there are things they need to change. The biggest thing would be the mindset, then outward things like music, clothing, eye-contact; a professional appearance/attitude on and off the stage in dealing with agents, clients, fellow performers, lighting and sound techs, etc.

There is usually a difference in a stage persona and how you deal with the people behind the scenes. You can be "cutting edge" on stage, but backstage, you need to be good old-fashioned reliable: Be on time, do what makes the overall show go well, be polite, don't be a prima dona.

*A top professional
**A professional on the lower end of the heap


"A successful individual typically sets his next goal somewhat but not too much above his last achievement. In this way he steadily raises his level of aspiration." ~Kurt Lewin
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Joe Salter
Level 3



USA
691 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2010 :  09:07:18  Show Profile  Visit Joe Salter's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Quote by Vandrizzle:
I'm beginning to look at juggling as a tool that i have to help people and to entertain rather than a sport. I've been performing a lot lately and it's far more fun than competing with a 2:00 routine only decipherable by a computer program that no one outside of juggling really knows about.


That's great! Keep using your juggling to connect and entertain/amaze others-that's powerful and beautiful. It takes a lot of other skills to be a successful performer, Dave and Anthony are the ones to comment on this. I've heard good advice from a successful comedy juggler/mc from Orlando: be yourself on stage and use humor in unexpected moments when you have to improvise.

I think that's my favorite thing about performing, improvising with humor and connecting in a personal way to the audience.

Joe S.

Edited by - Joe Salter on 07/03/2010 09:07:57
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jeremy jones
Level 1



USA
11 Posts

Posted - 07/19/2010 :  18:26:00  Show Profile  Click to see jeremy jones's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
I got my first perfect show today!! Lately I have been juggling for a wild west stunt show and I'm the preshow, I've been doing some street juggling and other gigs but mostly the stunt show.

Jeremy Jones
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anthonygatto
Forum Admin



USA
4280 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2010 :  12:00:12  Show Profile  Visit anthonygatto's Homepage Send anthonygatto a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Nice work Jeremy, perfect shows are definitely something to strive for. Don't get too caught up in them though. I have had some of my best shows include a drop or two. A good show will be represented by the audiences reaction to your work, and your own internal feeling of how you performed and connected with them. Of course you don't want to litter the stage with things like some jugglers have seen, but every now and then you'll have some mistakes that just don't make a difference at all. You will also experience perfect shows that you feel were a complete disaster.

A.G.

Art the end result of perception, wisdom, intelligence, discipline, hard work, passion, luck, accident, and coincidence.

A very smart unknown source
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Evan Patterson
Level 2



USA
357 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2010 :  12:50:58  Show Profile Send Evan Patterson a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Anthony if you drop a prop on stage should you just simply stop and pick it up? Or is it a good idea to do something funny like kick the droped prop off stage?

Evan
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anthonygatto
Forum Admin



USA
4280 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2010 :  16:47:16  Show Profile  Visit anthonygatto's Homepage Send anthonygatto a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It depends on your persona on stage. If you have some corky funny bits throughout then something funny to cover up is okay. I perform seriously, so depending on what I drop, I have different approaches. The first is to gather the prop as quit and inconspicuous as possible and continue on simply acting as if it didn't happen. Never let yourself show that you are distraught about that on stage in any way. The other, is if it is a difficult trick that I miss, such as 9 rings. I pick up the props give the "one more attempt" finger to the audience and hope I make it.

A.G.

Art the end result of perception, wisdom, intelligence, discipline, hard work, passion, luck, accident, and coincidence.

A very smart unknown source
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rdiss
Level 2



USA
430 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2010 :  17:10:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by anthonygatto

It depends on your persona on stage. If you have some corky funny bits throughout then something funny to cover up is okay. I perform seriously, so depending on what I drop, I have different approaches. The first is to gather the prop as quit and inconspicuous as possible and continue on simply acting as if it didn't happen. Never let yourself show that you are distraught about that on stage in any way. The other, is if it is a difficult trick that I miss, such as 9 rings. I pick up the props give the "one more attempt" finger to the audience and hope I make it.




AG not only knows his stuff, but he practices what he preaches. I saw him in Kooza in DC a couple of years ago. Fantastic show, both him specifically and everyone else. During his part, he dropped. It's probably pretty rare, but it happens sometimes, and it did. Honestly, I barely noticed. He made it look like it was intentional so that he could do a kick up. I seriously doubt very many people in the audience even noticed, because it came and went so quickly and so smoothly - completely integrated. AG's "mistakes" (however rare and minor) could teach us all a great deal.

-bd
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Frej
New/Lurker



Sweden
7 Posts

Posted - 04/11/2013 :  16:32:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Anthony. I've been thinking on what tricks to do on stage. Also what number of balls/clubs to do (I don't do rings). In your performance I think it's most entertaining when you do 3 clubs but I can barely do any of the 3club tricks that you do. However, my guess is that 3 clubs and 3 & 4 balls + finish with short runs of 5 and 7 balls is the most entertaining performance possible for someone at my level. Am I right? PS. a little information about my skills: I can do a lot of 3 & 4 ball tricks, some basic 5ball tricks and a little 6/7ball juggling (working on it). I have recently started juggling clubs, at the moment I can do 4 and flash 5.

Frej
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